How to Choose the Best Plastic Scale Model Size

  • By: Richard
  • Date: September 28, 2021
  • Time to read: 6 min.

Choosing the best plastic scale model size can be a difficult decision. There are many different scales and sizes available, making to figure out the right one for you. This article will help guide you through all of your options to decide which plastic model size will work best for your needs.

What Are The Different Sizes Of Plastic Scale Models And What Do They Represent?

The standard size of the plastic model is 30mm. These models represent military vehicles and tanks, as well as some aircraft. However, there are other sizes that you may consider purchasing based on your needs: 15mm (representing specialist military equipment), 20mm (usually representing infantry), and 25 mm for people who want to display a large number of models in their collection.

  • 15mm: These represent specialist military equipment, like tanks and aircraft.
  • 20mm: Usually, these are infantrymen or other ground troops, but they can also be American warplanes from the Second World War era (the typical scale of many early plastic model kits).
  • 25 mm: These are for people who want to display many models in their collection – they usually contain more pieces than smaller scales so that you have enough material to build your army.
  • 30mm: Representing vehicles and heavy weapons; this is an industry-standard size that manufacturers use when producing these types of toys.”
  • 40mm: This size is for aviation enthusiasts and people who want to have a large collection.
  • 50mm: This size models represent vehicles, like the American M47/M48 tank Sherman or Soviet T-54 tank from the Second World War era.”
  • 60mm: Representing vehicles, like the British Cromwell or German Panther tank from World War II.
  • 65mm: Representing tanks and heavy weapons, typically of a more modern era, rarer, rarer, rarer than other sizes.
  • 70mm: These models represent aircraft.
  • 75mm: This size represents aircraft and tanks, ground troops.
  • 80mm: Representing aircraft.”
  • 90mm: People who want to build up a huge collection of models or display them together. These are usually for aviation enthusiasts but can be used for just about anything – they’re really as big as you need them to be! However, the downside is that these kits take more time and patience than smaller plastic model sizes because there are so many pieces involved to make your army look good on the battlefield (or in the air).”
  • 100mm: This size doesn’t represent any military vehicles or equipment specifically; it’s too big for almost anything except making an impressive-looking scene outdoors with some mountains. They’re also relatively rarer compared to the smaller sizes.
  • 120mm: These models are for people that want to build up a huge collection of models or display them together – they’re really as big as you need them to be! However, the downside is that these kits take more time and patience because there are so many pieces involved to make your army look good on the battlefield (or in the air).”
  • 130mm: This size doesn’t represent any military vehicles or heavy weapons specifically; it’s too big for most anything other than making an impressive looking scene outdoors with some mountains.”
  • 150mm-200 mm: Representing aircraft…”
  • 250 mm-300 mm: Representing tanks, like American M47/M48 tank Sherman from World War II.”
  • 350 mm-400mm: Representing aircraft…”
  • 500 mm+: This size is for people who want to make an impressive-looking scene outdoors with some mountains. These kits take more time and patience because there are so many pieces involved to make your army look good on the battlefield (or in the air).”

This is the most useful list of scales and sizes you’ll ever see:

Item

Scale

Model Lenght

Actual Lenght

Senna McLaren MP4/4

1:8

552mm

4416mm

Hummer H1

1:8

570mm

4560mm

HMS Surprise

1:48

1334mm

64032mm

HMS Victory

1:84

1250mm

105000mm

Spitfire

1:12

760mm

9120mm

D51 200 Steam Locomotive

1:24

880mm

21120mm

Suzuki GSX 1300R Hayabusa

1:4

535mm

2140mm

Millennium Falcon

1:1

808mm

808mm

You can’t help but be amazed by the ingenuity of scale models. The larger an object is, the more it needs to be scaled down in size for a manageable model!

You might want to try this yourself at home – remember that scaling up or shrinking something too much may not always give you desirable results.

The Benefits Of A Larger Scale Model

A larger-scale model will be a much more accurate representation of the original and will allow you to get up close without having any distortion. It’s also worth noting that they are typically easier for younger children to handle than smaller models, making them ideal if your kids want something specific like an airplane or spaceship!

The Benefits Of A Smaller Scale Model

A smaller-scale model will be more affordable than a larger one, making them the better choice if you are on a budget. They’re also perfect for those who want something that can fit in their pocket or purse, and they often have fewer parts, making it easier for younger kids to build!

Why You Should Always Consider The Scale When Buying A Model

Always keep in mind the scale of the model you want to buy when shopping for one. If it’s too big, then it won’t be something that can easily fit on your desk or bookshelf, and if it’s too small, you may not get a good representation of what was originally presented.

The Benefits Of A Larger Scale Model:

  • More accurate representation than smaller models
  • Easier for kids to handle
  • The perfect choice for those who are on a budget!

Smaller Models Have Their Own Advantages Too:

  • The affordable option (critical if you have multiple children)
  • Fewer parts which make them easier to build with older siblings or parents
  • Perfect for those who want a model that can fit in their pocket or purse

What Are Some Common Scales Used In Modeling?

Common scales of modeling are:

  • N Scale, which is the most popular for railroads in the US and Canada
  • G Gauge (or Gauge One) used by model railroaders in Australia and New Zealand. The size difference between gauges can be seen when comparing a G-scale locomotive to an N-scale one!
  • Z Scale – The small scale is the smallest because it shows life at the height of 72 inches or 180 centimeters. This means that you’ll find everything from houses down to cars all in these small models! It’s common for them to have a miniature person included, so they make great displays.
  • O Scale – also called Large Scale Models, is the most popular and typically used for trains. These models often come with small people included making them even more fun!

Pros And Cons Of Each Scale Type

N Scale

Pros: N-scale trains are small and can be good for places like offices and dorm rooms.

Cons: The train cars may not be as detailed or accurate as of the original product.

G Gauge

Pros: G Gauge trains are the most realistic and detailed, which makes them great for collectors.

Cons: They’re also the largest scale type, making a display in smaller spaces like offices or dorm rooms difficult difficult difficult.

Z Scale

Pros: The trains are the most detailed and realistic, which makes them perfect for collectors.

Cons: Z Scale train models require a large amount of space to display properly.

O Scale

Pros: O Scale trains are a great option for those looking to save space and make their collection more mobile.

Cons: The models aren’t as detailed or realistic, making them difficult to enjoy if you’re a collector.

Conclusion

We hope that this article has helped guide your decision on which plastic model size is best for you! Remember to ask yourself these questions before choosing the right one for you.

Richard

Hi! I'm Richard Baker, a miniature painter who has been painting for about ten years. My website is packed with great advice that I've learned from both books and personal experience on building and painting miniatures.

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